LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION!


I am amazed by this new product my son told me about. I live in a house built in 1976 and it's in great shape and all, but when something breaks, it's usually an expensive fix. Well, the light in my walk in closet had a fan bead pull and it broke off. My options are to get a new fixture put in to update this closet or to leave the light on all the time (I've been leaving the light on all the time). When I told my son about this, he told me to buy this lightbulb-well, I'm a woman and I would never have thought of a motion detector lightbulb had been invented. I'm sure there are other women (and men) out there who would not know this either.


Starbucks offers free coffee to front-line responders through December

  • Starting December 1 through December 31, any customer who identifies as a front-line responder to the COVID-19 outbreak will receive a tall brewed coffee (hot or iced) at no charge (see full eligibility list below).

  • The offer can be redeemed at Starbucks U.S. company-operated locations and select licensed stores.

Free Coffee Offer Eligibility

Those eligible for the offer include front-line health care providers and first responders, including: doctors, nurses, public health workers, pharmacists, dispatchers, fire fighters, paramedics, EMTs, law enforcement officers, dentists and dental hygienists, mental health workers (therapist, psychologist, social worker, counselor, etc.), hospital staff such as janitor/housekeeping/security, military on active duty, contact tracers, vaccine and pharmaceutical researchers, pilots, flight attendants, TSA, and medical researchers.


FLIGHT ATTENDANTS HAVE A LANGUAGE YOU DON'T KNOW ABOUT!


What kind of secrets are flight attendants keeping from passengers? Turns out, it’s all hidden in the way they speak.

You’ve probably noticed that flight attendants use a certain vocabulary when they talk to each other inflight. Certain words like “red eye” or “dead head” might be fairly well known amongst seasoned travelers, but there are a few words that you might not be familiar with.

For those who are unaware, “red eye” refers to flights that are overnight and “dead head” is an airline employee who is on board a flight, but is off duty. Mystery solved.

After learning these terms, you may be intrigued to know more of the secret language flight attendants use to communicate. Well, in truth, they’re really just using a short-hand language that other flight attendants are familiar with in order to get the job done as efficiently as possible. In some cases, these terms allow flight attendants to communicate about some of the less-glamorous aspects of their job without troubling passengers.


Galley and galley queen

A galley is essentially the airplane kitchen. This is where flight attendants prepare meals, beverages, and set up other services for the cabin, according to Airportag. A “galley queen” is a slang term for a flight attendant who is particularly territorial over this area and does not like other people intruding in this space, the HuffPost reported.

Jump seat

According to BBC, the jump seat is a special, smaller seat that flight attendants use during take off, landing, and turbulence. It automatically folds up, or “jumps” when the flight attendant stands up, hence the name.


Spinners and runners

These terms are used to identify a seasoned flyer’s least favorite passengers, according to BBC. A spinner is a passenger who arrives at the last minute without a seat assignment, so they are told to board the plane and look for a seat. They usually just stand in the aisle looking around, or “spinning.” Runners are passengers who are late or are coming from another flight, so they’re found running through the airport to catch the flight.

Miracle flight

This may be a little mean spirited, but “miracle flight” is a term used for a passenger who needs the assistance of a wheelchair to board the flight but “miraculously” does not require it to deplane. Apparently, some passengers abuse the system by using a wheelchair to get on a plane early.

Bulkhead

This is the wall that divides the aircraft. It’s usually before the first row and is also where you can often find the lavatories and galley.

Chimes

What are all those dings you hear throughout your flight? Flight attendants call them the chimes. They can vary in tone and can mean many different things — for example, if a passenger presses the service button, the pilot calls, or if there’s an emergency.


eBay Offers Free Appraisals At Drive-Thru Authentication Station


Following a 25 percent revenue increase in Q3, eBay has converted a Los Angeles gas station into a drive-thru “Authentication Station” where people can appraise and sell their high-end sneakers, watches and collectibles without leaving the car.

The socially-distant initiative comes on the heels of eBay’s new Authenticity Guarantee, a program that involves independent experts verifying items through inspections. The offering is currently available for $200-plus sneakers and watches, two of the marketplace’s largest and popular luxury categories.

To get an appraisal, attendees drive up and stay in their car as an eBay attendant—a top eBay seller and a member of third-party authentication partner Sneaker Con—will take the item inside the station for inspection. Once the item is verified, the person has the option to sell on the spot.






Hey, keep reading my blogs.

Val